Resurfacing

Print Resurfacing is one of my favorite techniques.  A variety of effects can be achieved through the simple process of heat pressing a printed image with a piece of specialty paper, ie: matte or gloss, between the print surface and the heat platten.  We have used this technique successfully over the years to mimic litho-transfer, create high-gloss jewel-tone, or even just to enhance halftone printing.  With a little R&D time (oh how I wish we had some) and creativity, many more effects could be achieved.  The following images show the two varieties of paper that we typically utilize as well as a promotional print that we use to show both resurfacing effects next to a standard print:

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Matte paper is shown on left and gloss paper on right. The surface of the ink will take on the characteristics of whichever paper variety is utilized

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This promotional piece shows different resurfacing effects on the same image (left and right). The image in the center is untreated.

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Standard print without treatment.  Note the moderate fibrillation.

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Matte resurfacing smoothes the print surface in both a visual and tactile sense.

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Gloss resurfacing smooths the print surface as well as creating a sheen. The level of sheen will vary depending on the inks in use.

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Detail shot of the untreated print

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Detail shot of the matte resurfacing effect

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Extreme detail of the untreated print

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Extreme detail of the resurfaced print. Note the halftone clarity and definition

 

     

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